July 16, 2021 NF Legislative Roundup: Implementation Troubles

Now that most state legislative sessions are over, government officials are having some implementation troubles with their new laws. Here are some of those issues!

Arizona

  • HB2898
    • Why we’re watching: Arizona’s leaders have once again joined the throng of moronic resistance to “critical race theory,” or the teaching that America’s institutions perpetuate racism and poverty. Schools that teach these ideas face $5,000 fines, the first of such penalties signed into law.
  • HB2906
    • Why we’re watching: If banning critical race theory wasn’t bad enough, Gov. Ducey signed HB2906 into law, which prohibits local government from requiring employees’ participation in training that suggests people have implicit or explicit biases based on race.

Missouri

  • SB26 and SB53
    • Why we’re watching: These pieces of legislation are one step forward for Missouri and two steps backward. While they’ll track problematic officers that bounce from one town to another for work, they also penalize cities that reduce police budgets and lift residency requirements for officers.
  • SB60
    • Why we’re watching: Missouri has finally joined dozens of other states to ban chokeholds in the wake of George Floyd’s murder last year. The legislation, signed Wednesday, also increases penalties against officers that behave improperly toward those in their custody.

Nevada

  • SB22
    • Why we’re watching: This year, Nevada lawmakers passed a law capping how much the state can deduct from inmates’ bank accounts – 25% for funds from family and 50% through job earnings. However, the state is experiencing some implementation troubles. One inmate saw a money transfer from his wife deducted 60% by the stat, or more than double the legal limit.

What do you think of the bills in this week’s legislative roundup? Did we miss anything? Drop us a line on any of our social channels or hit us up through our contact us form. Let us know what’s happening in YOUR neighborhood!

Scroll to top